October 27, 2021

A dementia dancer, coveted cleaner and ambulance mechanic for everyone who wins the Cares One Award.

They are true community champions – selfless people who go out of their way to help others.

Not all of them can work in the first place in healthcare, but their behind-the-scenes efforts ensure that everything goes smoothly and people are safe.

From left to right for The Sun Sung Hero Nominees for the Care Ones Award: Barney Jones, Louise Gower and Seek Mohango

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From left to right for The Sun Sung Hero Nominees for the Care Ones Award: Barney Jones, Louise Gower and Seek Mohango

That’s why he has been nominated for this year’s Hung Keru Jit Awards for his song Hero Gong.

The winner will be presented at a television ceremony later this month.

Here we show our three great finalists.

Louis Gower.

Twinkle Todd became a tick-tock sensation after videos of her dancing went viral at Louis Gower Dementia Care Center.

Not content with encouraging his caregivers, he also raised significant funds for Alzheimer’s support by collecting medicines and essential purchases for the vulnerable during epidemics.

Who cares wins the award.

The Care Once Awards honors those who have helped take care of the nation.

Here are the categories:

  • 999 heroes.
  • The best charity.
  • The best doctor.
  • The best midwife.
  • The best nurse.
  • A cornerstone pioneer.
  • Mental health hero.
  • National Lottery Award.
  • Nameless hero.
  • Young hero

“We started dancing to cheer up. They were so bad. There was no harmony between any of us,” said Lewis of the Old Silk Works Dementia Center in Wilts, Warminster.

“But when they left, we told the people that we decided to raise money to pay for the restraint. It worked. We all came early in the morning to film the dance, and we did it in seven days.” Collected پون 800.

The mother of three cooked 14 roast dinners for the weak near her home every Sunday at the height of the lockdown.

Louise, 42, has worked at the Old Silk Works Day Club – run by Alzheimer’s Support – for three years and is passionate about her job.

He said: “It’s not like work. There are days when I come home and have the most fun day and think: ‘Wow, I just got paid.’

“It’s a very rewarding job. I’ve seen members go away smiling and a lot of people know it’s just a day when they leave home to work, it means a lot. I know I’ve taken a break from his career.

“At the beginning of the lockdown we had to learn that we had to shut down. We were shut down for five months and we lost 19 members at that time, not through Coved, but a lot of people went down without this social connection. Went to. “

Every Sunday, at the height of the lockdown, Louis Gower cooked 14 roast dinners for the weak near his home.

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Every Sunday, at the height of the lockdown, Louis Gower cooked 14 roast dinners for the weak near his home.

Maria Knock, 53, a fire safety officer from Westbury, Wilts, nominated Louis for the kindness and compassion she showed to her father, Ronald Lane, who died in February at the age of 87 after a six-year battle with dementia. Done

Maria said: “I met Louis when my father Ronald started attending the club a few years ago. The club atmosphere was always very friendly. No matter his illness, Louis made everyone happy. What and how they really mattered, and Louise made sure no one was forgotten.

“Having a loved one with severe dementia during the lockdown was one of the hardest things I was going through but Lewis regularly paid us fees and he formed small groups so that caregivers and members could still talk. Talk to you soon. “

Louise encouraged Maria to volunteer at the center, where she now works two days a week.

Seeker Mohango.

Seekers were sweeping the coveted wards six days a week at the height of the Mohangu epidemic.

The home supervisor – who worked at Newham Hospital, East London – had to shower on his return from his shift before he could hug his nine-year-old daughter, Maysha.

The 59-year-old seeker said: “It was incredibly busy during the first wave.

“We had to do a lot of cleaning because the patients were transferred from ward to ward. My team had to make sure it was clean and safe.

“I often stay a few hours at the end of my shift and although I want to work from Monday to Friday, I often do at least one day on the weekends.”

Seekers were sweeping the Cove Ward six days a week at the height of the Mohangu epidemic.

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Seekers were sweeping the Cove Ward six days a week at the height of the Mohangu epidemic.Credit: Oliver Dixon.

Salik says he was worried about carrying the virus to his wife Begum, 49, his 19-year-old son Ajmal and Maisha – but took every precaution and was always careful to wear his PPE.

He said: “My family was worried and Maisha would say to me: ‘Daddy, you have to be careful, take a shower.’

“Even now, when I get home, she will tell me I have to take a shower before I can hug her.”

The former Pizza Hut manager managed a team of staff and said he loved meeting patients and was proud to work for the NHS.

Make a difference

The seeker was nominated by Dr. Andrew Kelso, 47, medical director of the Barts Health NHS Trust.

Dr Kelso said: “I first met the seeker long before the epidemic and was known for keeping everything around the hospital so clean.

“He promotes the filth of junior doctors and it makes a big difference in their lives. But when it happened, the seeker came into his own.

The seeker did a great job and he did it all with a smile on his face. He is very modest and talks to anyone. He put aside his feelings or worries about Coved even though he has a family at home and the work is done now.

Dr. Andrew Kelso said the seeker was known for keeping everything clean in the hospital before the epidemic.

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Dr. Andrew Kelso said the seeker was known for keeping everything clean in the hospital before the epidemic.Credit: Oliver Dixon.

Barney Jones

For the first nine months of the epidemic, Barney Jones took only one day off as an ambulance repair workshop supervisor for the East of England Ambulance Service.

The 48-year-old worked 14 hours a day, seven days a week to keep ambulances on the road and save lives with the help of paramedics.

Barney allowed his team’s parents to go home on time during the lockdown while taking on extra work.

Despite calling his teammate Teresa extremely vulnerable to code-19, Barney continued to work around the clock.

He says: “When the epidemic was announced, I assigned myself to work seven days a week so that not many boys would have to work.

Barney Jones had only one day off in the first nine months of the epidemic.

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Barney Jones had only one day off in the first nine months of the epidemic.Credit: Damien McFadden.

“It just gave the kids a home life.”

Barney worked for the East of England Ambulance Service for six years and was soon promoted to workshop supervisor.

Looking back, he is proud of the work his team has done to ensure that frontline workers reach as many patients as possible.

He says: “During epidemics, I really felt that I and all the boys made a little difference.

“We can go home with pride. What we have done has helped ordinary people.

“There was little waiting time for ambulances in East England.

“It makes a big difference when you have three paramedics who have no vehicles and you can get two ambulances out in two hours.”

Presented by his partner Teresa Lewis for the Sing Hero Award, Barney hopes his nomination will shed light on the work of ambulance mechanics in the NHS.

Great work pressure

He says: “I feel very humbled to be nominated.

“There are a lot of people out there who deserve it more than I do.

“If I win the award, it will mean everything to the operations support team at the East of England Ambulance Service.

“They do a wonderful job and receive little recognition from the general public.

“This award will go a long way in showing what people do behind the scenes.”

Barney’s partner Teresa Lewis says: “During epidemics, Barney has worked hard despite being mentally and physically debilitated, making sure that extra vehicles are available.

These hero hero finalists Barney Jones helped ensure that lives were saved during epidemics by placing ambulances on the road.

Despite the heavy workload, he worked with his staff on tools to ensure that paperwork awaited him.

“For Barney, this extra ambulance on the road means another life.

“He makes sure his staff is taken care of, making sure they have a day off, even when it means he doesn’t get one.”

Devina McCall is hosting the Ho Care One Awards this year.

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Devina McCall is hosting the Ho Care One Awards this year.Credit: Rex

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