October 18, 2021

Thousands of children under the age of five are being treated at hospitals and A&E.

Throughout the hospital. Scotland Preschool children are dealing with a very unusual increase in the disease, with thousands less than usual in A&E departments for five years.

The new figures show that in the four-week period to September 26, 14,012 children under the age of five attended the emergency department.

That’s just 10,000 less than the pre-epidemic average for the same period in 2018 and 2019, meaning A&E attendance for people under five was 41 percent higher than normal.

Glasgow Times: A&E attendance for people under five in Scotland was 43% higher than normal in mid-September, changing the pattern seen in 2020A&E attendance for people under the age of five in Scotland was 43% higher than normal in mid-September, changing the pattern seen in 2020

Despite the obstacles A&E faced during September, attendance levels in each other age group were actually – or below – average.

Hospital admissions for people under the age of five also increased during September, in contrast to the total number of patients receiving treatment, which is about 10 to 14 percent lower than the pre-coed level.

Data, from the public. Health. Scotland shows that 5,605 children under the age of five were hospitalized during September – an increase of 1,090 (24) compared to the same period in 2018 and 2019.

Glasgow Times:

Glasgow Times: At one point in September, hospital admissions for people under the age of 5 were 34 percent higher than average, while every other age group was at or below pre-epidemic levels.  Overall hospital admissions (graph below) were below pre-epidemic levels throughout September (Source: Public Health Scotland)At one point in September, hospital admissions for people under the age of 5 were 34 percent higher than the average, with every other age group living at or below pre-epidemic levels. Overall hospital admissions (graph below) were below pre-epidemic levels throughout September (Source: Public Health Scotland)

It is not clear what is the trend in very young children compared to older groups.

However, the arrival of young children and preschoolers who require medical attention, especially since the beginning of August, coincides with the non-seasonal increase in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

RSV, a common virus that usually occurs in the winter, causes mild cold-like symptoms in most people.

However, in young children and infants it can cause bronchiolitis – pneumonia – which makes it difficult to breathe and can be fatal.

A PHS respiratory monitoring report, published Wednesday, notes that 305 cases have been confirmed by laboratory testing during the week beginning September 27.

He added: “The vast majority of RSV detections so far have been in people under the age of five. The typical RSV season usually peaks between week 49 and week 52.

“However, in 2020/21, there is a weekly increase. Laboratory-confirmed diagnoses have been reported for RSV since week 23. [beginning June 7] 2021 ”

Glasgow Times: At the end of the summer, the RSV rate in 2021 is much higher than in previous years (Source: Public Health Scotland)RSV rates in late summer 2021 have been much higher than in previous years (Source: Public Health Scotland)

The PHS also noted that in recent weeks there has been an increase in laboratory-confirmed diagnoses of other non-influenza and non-covid respiratory pathogens, including rhinovirus, one of the common cold-causing viruses.

The flow stays at the “baseline” level.

Earlier this year, Public Health England modeling predicted a sharp rise in RSV in autumn and winter, especially in children under the age of three, as coveted restrictions have been lifted.

According to the forecast, hospital admissions will be required for 20 to 50 percent more cases than usual, and such an increase would require at least doubling the number of intensive care beds.

Symptoms of RSV infection include a temperature of 37.8 ° C or higher, a dry and persistent cough, difficulty feeding, and rapid or noisy breathing.

The current rise in RSV in Scotland reflects pre-existing patterns in the Southern Hemisphere earlier this year, with New Zealand hospitals delaying surgery and turning playrooms into temporary wards amid a demand for children’s beds. Were forced to

Glasgow Times:

Most children get RSV naturally before the age of two, but successive lockdowns and social isolation have eroded the immune system and created the best conditions for the virus to reproduce – With the fear that the same pattern could happen with the flu.

It came as Health Secretary Hamza Youssef said the NHS in Scotland was facing an “incredibly, incredibly difficult winter” despite raising 300 million in funding.

Mr Youssef told Hollywood’s Cowed Recovery Committee that in addition to the potential Cowed pressure, low levels of immunity to the flu could cause severe stress.

Scottish Labor MSP Alex Rowley expressed concern on behalf of trade unions that the ratio of nurses to patients in hospitals is sometimes “too high”.

Mr Yousef said staff levels, at the head count, were at record highs.

He added: “Of course we will continue to recruit. My. [winter plan] Significant ambitions and recruitment, not only for nurses but also for the band Two to Two Four.

“But I have to be with the members and the people.

“These measures will help alleviate some of the challenges, but we are still in an incredibly difficult winter.

“Physicians tell me that their real concern is not just cowardice – but we hope to put a significant dent in them because we are controlling the transmission – but the flu and other respiratory viruses because our strength Immunity is very low.

“Last year, there was not much circulation due to flow lockdown and limited measures.”

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