Kids Ruined My Sleep So I Tried Methods To Help Me Go From Headstand To Night Socks And Here’s The Best

Are you struggling to get a good night’s sleep?

Studies show that about one in ten people suffer from chronic insomnia, and one in eight of us survive by sleeping just five hours a night.

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Linsey tries sleep techniques that are said to help her fall asleep instantly and rates them on a scale of 1 to 10.Credit: Liz Gregg

And that was before the pandemic — since Covid broke out, sleep problems have been reported in about 45 percent of the population in several countries.

Writer Lynsey Hope, who is the mother of seven-year-old Jacob, four-year-old Olivia, and 21-month-old Ivy, is one of the unlucky ones.

She says: “I used to be a sleep champion, but now I really have a hard time sleeping and I wake up early.

“I rarely have more than three or four hours. I think the years of waking up at night to put my kids to bed have programmed my body to keep waking up even if they’re all asleep.

“I often wake up with a headache.”

We know about the things we have to avoid if we want a good night – gadgets in the bedroom, caffeine and late-night meals.

But what can we do to improve our sleep?

Here, Linsey tries sleep techniques that are said to help her fall asleep instantly, and rates them on a scale of 1 to 10.

Do a headstand

It Is Believed That The Headstand Before Going To Bed Helps The Flow Of Fresh Blood To The Brain.

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It is believed that the headstand before going to bed helps the flow of fresh blood to the brain.Credit: Liz Gregg

The science: Headstand before bed is believed to help bring fresh blood to the brain, especially to the major glands—the pituitary and hypothalamus—helping you fall asleep faster.

It is also designed to detoxify the adrenal glands, which can cause insomnia.
Linsey says: “I’m fit and active, but headstand was difficult for me, and it’s unlikely that many people can do it.

“I had to balance on the door and it was still difficult for me to lift my legs without assistance. It was stressful, and for that matter, I got more turned on before bed than usual.

“Nothing about it helped me sleep. I hurt my neck, so unless you’re a yoga pro who can easily do this pose, I would have missed.”

Rating: 1/10

Have a midnight snack

Foods Containing Unsaturated Fats, Such As Peanut Butter, Increase Serotonin Levels And Keep You Feeling Full At Night.

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Foods containing unsaturated fats, such as peanut butter, increase serotonin levels and keep you feeling full at night.Credit: Liz Gregg

The science: Foods containing unsaturated fats, such as peanut butter, increase serotonin levels and keep you feeling full throughout the night.
Eating bananas with peanut butter can also cause drowsiness, as bananas contain magnesium, which promotes good sleep.

Linsey says: “Sometimes I go hungry in the morning and I always have breakfast early.

“The science behind this made me wonder if hunger is one of the reasons I wake up at night.

“When I first woke up between midnight and 1 a.m., I ate a few banana slices smeared with peanut butter. It wasn’t fun at all to go into the kitchen to cook it, and I woke up so much on my way back to bed that it took me forever to get back to sleep. Surprisingly, the next morning I slept longer.”

Rating: 5/10

Ice bath for five minutes

An Ice Bath Can Increase Levels Of Melatonin, A Natural Sleep-Inducing Hormone.

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An ice bath can increase levels of melatonin, a natural sleep-inducing hormone.Credit: Liz Gregg

The science: An ice bath can increase levels of melatonin, a natural sleep-inducing hormone.

Experts say the best time to take it is 20 minutes before you go under the covers.

Linsey says: “I liked the idea of ​​taking a bath before bed, but not a cold one. I tossed the ice pack into the water and stepped inside, breathless as the cold cubes washed over me.

“At first I thought the shock would wake me up, but once I got out I felt pretty relaxed and I slid under the warm duvets with relief.

“Preparing a bath this late at night was a bit silly after a long day. An ice shower would be faster and I’m sure it would work just as well.”

Rating: 7/10

military breath

The Technique Involves Relaxing The Muscles Of The Face, Including The Tongue, Jaw, And Muscles Around The Eyes.

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The technique involves relaxing the muscles of the face, including the tongue, jaw, and muscles around the eyes.Credit: Liz Gregg

Science: A method developed by the US military during World War II that should help you fall asleep in just two minutes.

It involves relaxing the muscles of the face, including the tongue, jaw, and muscles around the eyes. Lower your shoulders as low as you can, and then your upper and lower arms, one side at a time. Exhale as you relax your chest, then your legs, starting at your hips and working your way down.

Then spend ten seconds trying to clear your mind before thinking of one of these three images:

You are lying in a canoe on a calm lake, and above you there is nothing but a clear blue sky. Or you are lying in a black velvet hammock in a pitch black room.

Or thirdly, you tell yourself, “Don’t think, don’t think, don’t think” over and over again for about ten seconds.

Linsey says, “I tried it for a few nights, and by the fifth night, I was starting to get the hang of it.

“I felt a little silly sitting on the edge of the bed and breathing, and soon my thoughts turned to the work that I had not finished and to the pile of laundry that I had to sort out in the morning. But repeating the phrase “Don’t think” over and over again made me feel tired. I probably slept for about 30 minutes, not two minutes as advertised – but that’s a lot better than the one or two hours I usually spend tossing and turning.

“They say it works for 96 percent of people after six weeks of practice, so I’ll keep trying.”

Rating: 6/10

Bubble

This Technique Has The Same Calming Effect As Slow, Deep Breathing.

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This technique has the same calming effect as slow, deep breathing.Credit: Liz Gregg

Science: Dr. Rachel Marie Salas, professor of neurology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in the US, recommends this technique to help you fall asleep because it has the same calming effect as slow, deep breathing. This is something that most of us can achieve without any practice.

Linsey says: “Blowing soap bubbles around the bedroom before crawling under the covers seemed a little silly, but I was willing to try anything to get a good night’s sleep.

“It calmed my breathing, but I really had to take my time to try and relax.

“I plan to test this on my daughter Olive, who is also struggling to sleep.”

Rating: 4/10

Wear socks to bed

Warm Feet Dilate Blood Vessels And Cool The Body, Which Signals The Brain That It'S Time To Sleep.

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Warm feet dilate blood vessels and cool the body, which signals the brain that it’s time to sleep.Credit: Liz Gregg

Science: Warm feet dilate blood vessels and cool the body, which signals the brain that it’s time to sleep.

A study conducted at Rutgers University in the US found that those who go to bed in socks tend to fall asleep faster, sleep longer and wake up less frequently at night.

Linsey says: “I suffer from cold feet, sometimes I lie awake and fidget because they are so cold that I can’t get comfortable.

“Wearing socks made a huge difference. I felt more comfortable and relaxed with warm feet and I fell asleep faster. Although I had to take them off early in the morning because my feet got too hot, I fell asleep again.

“Maybe going to bed in socks is not the sexiest look.

“But it’s much better than bags under the eyes.”

Rating: 10/10

Linsey’s verdict

“Whether it’s a headstand, an ice bath, or a cup of chamomile tea, sleep won’t help overnight.

“However, using these methods stopped my mind from running and thinking about anxiety before bed.

“Wearing socks before bed was the biggest win I’ve ever tried. It’s such a simple thing, but it has really changed the quality of my sleep.

“I definitely think breathing techniques can help you relax too, although I’m not 100% committed to the military method.”

Vp Graphic Nod Off 1

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  1. Soft Foam EarHub £4.99 Boots
  2. Myvitamins Relax Vitamins, £8.99, lookfantastic.com
  3. Alexander Kay Ceramic Diffuser £67.50 allbeauty.com
  4. Neom Perfect Night’s Sleep Pillow Mist, £8, neomorganics.com
  5. Kitsch pink silk mask £13 www.cultbeauty.co.uk
  6. Nasal Snoring Suppression Device – Medium (30 Nights) £18.50 Boots
  7. Weighted Blanket £49 kudd.ly
  8. Pillow Bed of Nails £40 www.cultbeauty.co.uk
  9. Soothing Glow Recipe Sleep Mask, £20.50, cultbeauty.co.uk
  10. Soak Sunday, £18, soaksunday.com

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