October 18, 2021

I went through menopause in 48 hours after being diagnosed with breast cancer.

TV presenter Trisha Goddard, 63, undergoes menopause while undergoing treatment for breast cancer.

When my doctor said: “You are perimenopausal,” I replied: “What does that mean?”

Trisha Goddard, 63, underwent menopause while undergoing treatment for breast cancer.

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Trisha Goddard, 63, underwent menopause while undergoing treatment for breast cancer.

I was 50 years old, I had just been diagnosed with breast cancer and I had never heard that word before.

But when I googled it, it made a lot of sense.

My periods were always erratic, but in the last two years, they became more and more isolated and I was swinging the mood.

I had a holiday, a low mood and a sense of “erg”. I forgot too and was struggling to concentrate.

I have worked in television for many years, and I never panicked, but I was experiencing a slight discomfort and I did not know why.

There was nothing that I could do. It was like this: “I don’t have anything to feel like that?”

I also had a huge loss of work, but at the time I thought it was because I didn’t like my husband. [psychotherapist Peter Gianfrancesco, 60] No more.

My mother died four years ago on July 24, 2004, so I wonder if my symptoms are due to grief.

I also had mental health problems in the past and I thought: “Please tell me I’m not going to be depressed!”

When I had another period after my first encounter with chemotherapy, the doctors panicked because my cancer was linked to estrogen, and the idea was to eliminate all estrogen.

So they increased my chemo dose and I basically went through menopause in 48 hours – it usually takes three to five years, so it was like throwing on a brick wall.

Everything was more intense because it was due to drugs, and I had a terrible hot flush.

Working with experts, the wonderful Menopause Campaign aims to help all women - regardless of their age, income and background

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Working with experts, the wonderful Menopause Campaign aims to help all women – regardless of their age, income and background
Our research found eight out of ten people who take HRT said it helped improve their lives - and without any side effects.

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Our research found eight out of ten people who take HRT said it helped improve their lives – and without any side effects.

My mindset was positive though, because it meant the chemo was working and my life was being saved. They may not be good, but it will have a positive effect.

The fact that my breast cancer was estrogen fuel meant I couldn’t do HRT, but I did get red triangular tea.

I discovered it halfway through my chemo treatment at a tea shop in Norfolk in 2008, when my make-up was running down my face and the lady behind the counter said: “You feel hot! Have you tried red clover tea?

Now I have every evening.

Menopause meant I had to make other adjustments. I’ve worn a nightie all my life, but I haven’t worn it anymore.

The dryness of the vagina that I experienced was aching and painful when I ran long distances, but I discovered non-hormonal, moisturizing pessaries, which was a revelation.

I divorced Peter in 2017. Our problems were not just about freedom.

If you understand the reasons for someone’s behavior, you can support them, but if you do not understand, it is completely different.

Menopause is not a women’s issue, it is an education issue.

Trisha went through menopause in 48 hours and said it was like being 'thrown on a brick wall'.

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Trisha went through menopause in 48 hours and said it was like being ‘thrown on a brick wall’.Credit: Rex

Men should know about it as much as women, because relationships tell women that they are “moody” or “cool” or “no fun” when they are going through menopause.

Peter was helpful when I was undergoing chemo, but none of us knew about perimenopause.

When schools teach children about birds and bees, I think they should also be taught about menopause.

As parents, we need to talk to our children about this. We must understand that it is a natural part of life, so it is not silent.

Mindset matters. I believe that as we reach menopause, we become wiser, more influential and stronger. Instead of mourning, we should celebrate becoming women’s leaders.

  • Listen to Trisha’s talk radio show Saturday, 1-4pm. Follow Trisha on Instagram Followtherealtrishagoddard.

What is menopause and at what age does it usually begin?

Menopause is a natural part of old age, which usually occurs when a woman is between the ages of 45 and 55.

In the UK, the average age for a woman to go through menopause is 51.

This is when the level of estrogen in the body starts to decrease.

During this time the periods become less frequent or they may stop abruptly, and women will not be able to conceive naturally after menopause.

One in 100 women experience menopause before the age of 40, and this is called premature ovarian failure or premature menopause.

Many celebrities have spoken about their experiences, including Lisa Snowden, Devina McCall, Michelle Hatton and Zoo Hardman.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms of menopause can begin before your period stops or your period stops, and can continue for four years or more after your last period.

Symptoms include:

  • Hot wash
  • Menstrual changes or irregularities.
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Anxiety and lack of confidence.
  • Low mood, irritability and depression.
  • Night sweats
  • Vaginal dryness or discomfort during sex.
  • Lack of work (sex drive)
  • Problems with concentration or memory.
  • weight gain
  • Bladder control.

Great menopausal cases.

An estimated one in five people in the UK are experiencing this.

Yet menopause is whispered in a calm tone as if it were embarrassing.

The stigma attached to migration means that women have been silent for centuries.

The Sun is determined to change that, launching a campaign to stop the menu to give the taboo a long-awaited kick, and women need their help.

The campaign has three objectives:

  • To make HRT free in England.
  • Provide support to achieve a menopause policy in each workplace.
  • To end the taboo around menopause.

The campaign is supported by a number of influential figures, including Baroness Karen Brady CBE, celebrities Lisa Snowden, Jane Moore, Michelle Hatton, Zoe Hardman, Saira Khan, Trisha Goddard, as well as Dr. Louise Newson, Caroline Harris MP, Includes Jess Phillips MP. , Caroline Knox MP and Rachel McLean MP.

A special study by Fabils, which surveyed 2,000 British women aged 45-65 who were or were undergoing menopause, found that 49 per cent of women had feelings of depression, while 7 per cent had menopause. During the suicide.

Fifty percent of respondents said there is not enough support for menopausal women, which is not good enough. It’s time to dump her and move on.

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“Menopause is not a women’s issue, it’s an education issue,” says Trisha.Credit: Phil Panman
Tresha says men should know as much about menopause as women, because relationships are affected.

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Tresha says men should know as much about menopause as women, because relationships are affected.Credit: Rex
Trisha Goddard shed tears when she revealed she wanted to kill herself when voices in her head called her a “useless failure.”

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